Nice China Wheel Cover Mould photos

Nice China Wheel Cover Mould photos

Some cool china wheel cover mould images:

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Northrop P-61C Black Widow
china wheel cover mould
Image by Chris Devers
Compare & contrast:

Northrop P-61C Black widow:
* Front view
* Above view

Star Wars ARC-170 Fighter:
* Official page
* Wikia
* Wikipedia
* Toy review

I put it to you that they’re the SAME THING.

* twin engines
* double-cockpit in front
* gunner’s cockpit in back
* broad wing coming out from the middle

• • • • •

See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Steven F. Udvar-Hazy | Northrop P-61C Black Widow:

The P-61 Black Widow was the first U.S. aircraft designed to locate and destroy enemy aircraft at night and in bad weather, a feat made possible by the use of on-board radar. The prototype first flew in 1942. P-61 combat operations began just after D-Day, June 6, 1944, when Black Widows flew deep into German airspace, bombing and strafing trains and road traffic. Operations in the Pacific began at about the same time. By the end of World War II, Black Widows had seen combat in every theater and had destroyed 127 enemy aircraft and 18 German V-1 buzz bombs.

The Museum’s Black Widow, a P-61C-1-NO, was delivered to the Army Air Forces in July 1945. It participated in cold-weather tests, high-altitude drop tests, and in the National Thunderstorm Project, for which the top turret was removed to make room for thunderstorm monitoring equipment.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Northrop Aircraft Inc.

Date:
1943

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 450 x 1500cm, 10637kg, 2000cm (14ft 9 3/16in. x 49ft 2 9/16in., 23450.3lb., 65ft 7 3/8in.)

Long Description:
The P-61 Black Widow was the first United States aircraft designed from the start to find and destroy other aircraft at night and in bad weather. It served in combat for only the final year of World War II but flew in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific, and China-Burma-India theaters. Black Widow crews destroyed 127 enemy aircraft and 18 robot V-1 buzz bombs.

Jack Northrop’s big fighter was born during the dark days of the Battle of Britain and the London Blitz in 1940. British successes against German daylight bombers forced the Luftwaffe (German Air Force) to shift to night bombing. By the time Royal Air Force (RAF) Spitfires could launch, climb out, and then try to intercept these raids, the bombers crews had usually dropped their loads and turned for home. An aircraft was needed to patrol the skies over England for up to seven hours during the night, and then follow radar vectors to attack German aircraft before they reached their target. U.S. Army Air Corps officers noted this requirement and decided that America must have a night fighter if and when it entered the war.

The Army awarded a contract to Northrop on January 30, 1941. The resulting design featured twin tail booms and rudders for stability when the aircraft closed in behind an intruder. It was a large aircraft with a big fuel load and two powerful engines. Armament evolved into four 20 mm cannons mounted in the belly firing forward and a powered, remote-controlled turret on top of the center fuselage equipped with four .50 cal. machine guns. The three-man crew consisted of the pilot, a gunner seated behind him, and a radar observer/gunner at the rear behind the gun turret. Only the pilot could fire the cannons but any of the three could operate the machine guns.

Simultaneously, work was proceeding, at a laboratory run by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, to develop the airborne radar set. The Army tested an early design in a Douglas B-18 in 1941. The much-improved SCR-520 set was ready by early 1942. Meanwhile, Army enthusiasm for the XP-61 produced another contract on March 10, 1941, for 13 service-test YP-61s. Even before these airplanes flew, Northrop received orders for 410 production machines! Northrop test pilot Vance Breeze flew the aircraft on May 26, 1942. Although the Black Widow was nearly as large as a medium bomber, it was a true fighter. The only prohibited flight maneuvers were outside loops, sustained inverted flight, and deliberate spins.

As Northrop advanced the design toward production, supply problems arose and modifications became necessary. The 4-gun top turret was the same type fitted to the top forward position on the Boeing B-29 Superfortress (see NASM collection) and that bomber had production priority over the P-61. As a result, several hundred P-61s did not have this turret. Those that did experienced buffeting when the turret was traversed from side to side and a fix took time. By October 1943, the first P-61s were coming off the line. Training started immediately, and the first night fighters arrived in the European Theater by March 1944. Combat operations began just after D-Day (June 6) and the Black Widows quickly departed from their original role as defensive interceptors and became aggressors. They flew deep into German airspace, bombing and strafing trains and road traffic and making travel difficult for the enemy by day and at night.

P-61s arrived in the Pacific Theater at about the same time as the European Black Widows. For years, the Japanese had operated lone bombers over Allied targets at night and now U. S. fighters could locate and attack them. However, on June 30, 1944, a Mitsubishi BETTY (see NASM collection) became the first P-61 kill in the Pacific. Soon, Black Widows controlled the night skies. On the night of August 14-15, a P-61 named "Lady in the Dark" by her crew encountered an intruding Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (Peregrine Falcon) OSCAR (see NASM collection) and eventually forced it into the sea without firing a shot. Although the war was officially over, no one was sure that all of the Japanese had heard the message and stopped fighting. The American night fighters flew again the next night and "Lady in the Dark" again found a target. It was a Nakajima Ki-44 Shoki (Demon) TOJO and the fighters maneuvered wildly as they attempted to gain an advantage. The P-61 crew lost and reacquired the Ki-44 several times then finally lost it for good and returned to base. The next day ground troops found the wrecked TOJO. In the darkness, Lady in the Dark’s crew had forced the Japanese pilot to fly into the ground, again without firing a shot.

With the war over, the Army cancelled further production. Northrop had built 706 aircraft including 36 with a highly modified center fuselage. These F-15As (later redesignated RF-61C) mounted a number of cameras in the nose and proved able reconnaissance platforms. Many of these airplanes participated in the first good aerial photographic survey of the Pacific islands. A few, plus some special purpose P-61s, stayed in active service until 1950.

NASM’s Black Widow is a P-61C-1-NO, U.S. Army Air Forces serial number 43-8330. Northrop delivered it to the Army on July 28, 1945. By October 18, this P-61 was flying at Ladd Field, Alaska, in cold weather tests and it remained there until March 30, 1946. This airplane later moved to Pinecastle Air Force Base, Florida, for participation in the National Thunderstorm Project. The project’s goal was to learn more about thunderstorms and to use this knowledge to better protect civil and military airplanes that operated near them. The U. S. Weather Bureau and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) undertook the study with cooperation from the Army Air Forces and Navy. With its radar and particular flight characteristics, the P-61 was capable of finding the most turbulent regions of a storm, penetrating them, and returning crew and instruments intact for detailed study.

Pinecastle personnel removed the guns and turret from 43-8330 in July 1946 to make room for new equipment. In September, the aircraft moved to Clinton County Army Air Base, Ohio, where it remained until January 1948. The Air Force then assigned the aircraft to the Flight Test Division at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. After declaring the airplane surplus in 1950, the Air Force stored it at Park Ridge, Illinois, on October 3 along with important aircraft destined for the National Air Museum.

But 43-8830 was not done flying. NACA asked the Smithsonian to lend them the aircraft for use in another special program. The committee wanted to investigate how aerodynamic shapes behaved when dropped from high altitude. The Black Widow arrived at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Naval Air Station Moffett Field, California, on February 14, 1951. NACA returned the aircraft and delivered it to the Smithsonian at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, on August 10, 1954. When the engines shut down for the last time, this P-61 had accumulated only 530 total flight hours. Smithsonian personnel trucked it to the Paul Garber Facility in Suitland, Maryland. In 2006, the aircraft was preserved and assembled at the Udvar-Hazy Center. The three different paint schemes from its past service life have been revealed by carefully removing individual layers of paint.

Image from page 507 of “India rubber world” (1899)

Image from page 507 of “India rubber world” (1899)

Check out these automobile mould maker images:

Image from page 507 of “India rubber world” (1899)
automobile mould maker
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: indiarubberworld31phil
Title: India rubber world
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Rubber industry and trade
Publisher: [Philadelphia, Bill Brothers Publishing Corp.]
Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden
Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
The Largest Rubber Fac^or^- in Canada, and one of the Largest in the World. TRADE MARK

Text Appearing After Image:
SJHOE OUTPUT:15,000 Pairs Daily. Established 1854. THE CANADIAN RUBBER COMPANY OF MONTREAL MANUFACTURERS OF All Kind3 of High Grade Mechanical Rubber Goods AND SOLE MAKERS OF THE Celebrated CANADIAN Rubbers. BELTING, HOSE, PACKING. RUBBER TIRES, BOTH SOLID AND PNEUMATIC, LIGHT MECHANICAL AND MOULDED RUBBER GOODS, FOR AUTOMOBILES, CARRIAGES AND BICYCLES. DRUGGISTS SUNDRIES, CARRIAGE CLOTH, CLOTHING AND PROOFING, SPORTING AND STATIONERS GOODS, PLUMBERS GOODS, PATENT TILING, HORSE SHOE PADS, RUBBER HEELS, EVERYTHING IN RUBBER SPECIALITIES. FIRE HOSE AND FIRE DEPARTMENT SUPPLIES. Factory and Executive Offices : MONTREAL, P. Q. Sales Branches: HALIFAX, N.S., MONTREAL, Que., TORONTO, Ont., WINNIPEG, Man, VANCOUVER, B.C. SIR H. MONTAGU ALLAN President. D. LORNE McGIBBON General Manager. E. ALEX. WRIGHT Secretary-Treasurer, HARRISON C. FROST M.3nagei Mechanical Goods D^pt M.C. MULLARKY Manager Boot ar d Shoe Dept A. D. THORNTON General Superintendent.

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Another Humped-Back Tree
automobile mould maker
Image by Big Grey Mare
These lumpy trees fascinate me. This one is located at Lake Fort Parker State Park in Limestone County, Texas.

Thanks to dsc1110 for including the link below (2nd comment). Here is the info there. To see pictures of things made from burl, just click on the link in his comment.

A burl (British bur or burr) is a tree growth in which the grain has grown in a deformed manner. It is commonly found in the form of a rounded outgrowth on a tree trunk or branch that is filled with small knots from dormant buds. Burls are the product of a cambium. A burl results from a tree undergoing some form of stress. It may be environmental or introduced by humans. Most burls grow beneath the ground, attached to the roots as a type of malignancy that is generally not discovered until the tree dies or falls over. Such burls sometimes appear as groups of bulbous protrusions connected by a system of rope-like roots. Almost all burl wood is covered by bark, even if it is underground. Insect infestation and certain types of mold infestation are the most common causes of this condition.

In some tree species, burls can grow to great size. Some of the largest occur in redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens); when moisture is present, these burls can grow new redwood trees. The world’s largest and second-largest burls can be found in Port McNeill, British Columbia. One of the largest burls known to man was found around 1984 in the small town of Tamworth, Australia. It stands 6.4 ft tall, with an odd shape resembling a trombone.

Burls yield a very peculiar and highly figured wood, one prized for its beauty by many; its rarity also adds to its expense. It is sought after by people such as furniture makers, artists, and wood sculptors. There are a number of well-known types of burls (each from a particular species); these are highly valued and used as veneers in furniture, picture frames, household objects, automobile interior paneling and trim, and woodturning. The famous birdseye maple superficially resembles the wood of a burl but is something else entirely. Burl wood is very hard to work in a lathe or with hand tools because its grain is misshapen and not straight.

Some burls are more highly prized than others, including ones originating in rural areas in central Massachusetts, northeast Connecticut, and as far south as Philadelphia. Some types display an explosion of sorts which causes the grain to grow erratically, and it is these burls that the artist prizes over all other types. These spectacular patterns enhance the beauty of wood sculptures, furniture, and other artistic productions. Burls are harvested by a variety of methods. Many redwood trees have them, but there are two things that hinder the harvest of redwood burls, the first being that removing a burl can cause the death of the tree. The second is the sometimes tremendous size of redwood burls; removing them can require the use of heavy equipment, which can be expensive and difficult to get to the tree’s location.

Image from page 751 of “India rubber world” (1899)
automobile mould maker
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: indiarubberworld31phil
Title: India rubber world
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Rubber industry and trade
Publisher: [Philadelphia, Bill Brothers Publishing Corp.]
Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden
Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
THE CANADIAN RUBBER COMPANY OF MONTREAL MANUFACTURERS OF LIMITED All Kinds of High Grade Mechanical Rubber Goods AND SOLE MAKERS OF THE Celebrated CANADIAN Rubbers. BELTING, HOSE, PACKING. RUBBER TIRES, BOTH SOLID AND PNEUMATIC, LIGHT MECHANICAL AND MOULDED RUBBER GOODS, FOR AUTOMOBILES, CARRIAGES AND BICYCLES. DRUGGISTS SUNDRIES, CARRIAGE CLOTH, CLOTHING AND PROOFING, SPORTING AND STATIONERS GOODS, PLUMBERS GOODS, PATENT TILING, HORSE SHOE PADS, RUBBER HEELS, EVERYTHING IN RUBBER SPECIALITIES. FIRE HOSE AND FIRE DEPARTMENT SUPPLIES. Factory and Executive Offices : MONTREAL, P. Q. Sales Branches: HALIFAX, N.S., MONTREAL, Que., TORONTO, Ont., WINNIPEG, Man, VANCOUVER, B.C. SIR H. MONTAGU ALLAN President. D. LORNE McGIBBON General Manager. E. ALEX. WRIGHT Secretary-Treasurer. HARRISON C. FROST Managei Mechanical Goods Os«pt M. C. MULLARKY Manager Boot ai d Shoe Dept A. D. THORNTON General Superintendent.

Text Appearing After Image:
We are always open to correspondwith experienced Rubber men,both for Factory and ExecutiveWork. Inventions kindred to the Tradeand ideas for development,invited. Our DevelopmentDepartment gives these mattersspecial attention. EJtECOTIVE OPFICES AND WAREHOUSE July i, 1905.] THE INDIA HUBBER WORLD III Forsyth TRADE MARK CombinationMetal InsertionPacking andGasket Tubing

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Nice Automotive Parts Mold Manufacturers photos

Nice Automotive Parts Mold Manufacturers photos

Check out these automotive parts mold manufacturers images:

自動車部品向けめっき技術セミナー: グローバル企業における表面処理技術の最新動向 – 2014年9月5日
automotive parts mold manufacturers
Image by マクダーミッド
www.macdermid.co.jp/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/automot…

The MacDermid Automotive Summit, held in Kawasaki City on September 5, 2014, brought together Japan’s automotive OEMs and their supply chain to educate the market on innovative trends in surface treatment. Leading experts from Germany, the Netherlands, the U.K. and the U.S. spoke about MacDermid’s dynamic chemistries for the global automotive industry.

Representatives from Toyota, Honda, Nissan and other Japanese manufacturers participated in discussions on the following topics:

"ZinKlad System – from Zinc/Zinc Alloy Plating to Friction Control"

"High Alloy Zinc Nickel Deposit
– Enviralloy NiFlex12’s Ductility and Other Features"

"Cobalt-free Passivation System and the Update on European Legislation"

"Optimized Plating Solutions for MID (Molded Interconnect Devices)"

"Russian Mud Testing; Investigation of Anti-Corrosion Mechanism"

"evolve" Chrome-free Etching Process on Plastic Materials"

"Electroless Nickel – Engineering Coatings & Automotive Applications"

"Film Insert Molding: A Hardcoated Film for Plastic Parts"

"MacDermid: Your Global Supply Chain Partner"

自動車部品向けめっき技術セミナー: グローバル企業における表面処理技術の最新動向 – 2014年9月5日
automotive parts mold manufacturers
Image by マクダーミッド
www.macdermid.co.jp/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/automot…

The MacDermid Automotive Summit, held in Kawasaki City on September 5, 2014, brought together Japan’s automotive OEMs and their supply chain to educate the market on innovative trends in surface treatment. Leading experts from Germany, the Netherlands, the U.K. and the U.S. spoke about MacDermid’s dynamic chemistries for the global automotive industry.

Representatives from Toyota, Honda, Nissan and other Japanese manufacturers participated in discussions on the following topics:

"ZinKlad System – from Zinc/Zinc Alloy Plating to Friction Control"

"High Alloy Zinc Nickel Deposit
– Enviralloy NiFlex12’s Ductility and Other Features"

"Cobalt-free Passivation System and the Update on European Legislation"

"Optimized Plating Solutions for MID (Molded Interconnect Devices)"

"Russian Mud Testing; Investigation of Anti-Corrosion Mechanism"

"evolve" Chrome-free Etching Process on Plastic Materials"

"Electroless Nickel – Engineering Coatings & Automotive Applications"

"Film Insert Molding: A Hardcoated Film for Plastic Parts"

"MacDermid: Your Global Supply Chain Partner"

自動車部品向けめっき技術セミナー: グローバル企業における表面処理技術の最新動向 – 2014年9月5日
automotive parts mold manufacturers
Image by マクダーミッド
www.macdermid.co.jp/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/automot…

The MacDermid Automotive Summit, held in Kawasaki City on September 5, 2014, brought together Japan’s automotive OEMs and their supply chain to educate the market on innovative trends in surface treatment. Leading experts from Germany, the Netherlands, the U.K. and the U.S. spoke about MacDermid’s dynamic chemistries for the global automotive industry.

Representatives from Toyota, Honda, Nissan and other Japanese manufacturers participated in discussions on the following topics:

"ZinKlad System – from Zinc/Zinc Alloy Plating to Friction Control"

"High Alloy Zinc Nickel Deposit – Enviralloy NiFlex12’s Ductility and Other Features"

"Cobalt-free Passivation System and the Update on European Legislation"

"Optimized Plating Solutions for MID (Molded Interconnect Devices)"

"Russian Mud Testing; Investigation of Anti-Corrosion Mechanism"

"evolve" Chrome-free Etching Process on Plastic Materials"

"Electroless Nickel – Engineering Coatings & Automotive Applications"

"Film Insert Molding: A Hardcoated Film for Plastic Parts"

"MacDermid: Your Global Supply Chain Partner"

Cool China Plastic Parts For Car Manufacturer images

Cool China Plastic Parts For Car Manufacturer images

Some cool china plastic parts for car manufacturer images:

92041 china clay tankers Wembley to Dollands Moor 6B37
china plastic parts for car manufacturer
Image by train_photos
DB Schenker class 92 number 92041 named "Vaughan Williams" painted in EWS two tone railfreight grey livery and a three ‘O’ shaped channel tunnel roundel logo working 6B37 hauling empty NACCO (North American Car Corporation) tankers from Wembley European Freight Operating Centre to Dollands Moor Sidings as part of their return journey to Antwerpen (Antwerp) Docks, Belgium from Irvine Scotland on 28 February 2014. For the route taken see (www.flickr.com/photos/99279135@N05/14289727859/). 92041 traveled down to Wembley earlier in the day as 6M76 photographed at Northampton by Nigel Gould (www.flickr.com/photos/60599026@N05/12831694204/in/photoli…). Prior to this Brian Denton photogrphed these tankers filled with china clay slurry heading northwards towards Scotland on 26 February 2014 (www.flickr.com/photos/brian_dentons_linesidephotos-europe…). Once the tankers arrive back at Antwerpen Docks they are reloaded with china clay slurry (kaolin) made from rocks rich in kaolinite, Al2Si2O5(OH)4, imported from Brazil. This slurry is transported to Irvine, Scotland by 6S94 where it is used by the Finnish company, UPM-Kymmene (United Paper Mills Ltd) Corporation’s at their Caledonian Paper Mill to produce lightweight coated paper for printing magazines, catalogues and brochures.

92041 was assembled by the BRUSH Traction Company Loughborough in 1996, from sub-contracted components e.g. Procor UK bodyshell, Asea Brown Boveri (ABB Rail) traction converters and GTO (Gate Turn-Off thyristor) controlled via the MICAS-S2 electronics system, retractable third rail collector shoes and pantographs made by Brecknell Willis, the engraved aluminium BRUSH traction works plates made by J M Ranger Limited of Leicester and cast aluminium based alloy Crew Depot plaque produced by David Newton of Nottingham. For track to train communications class 92s were fitted with the Siemens International Train Radio (ITR) "chameleon" system which could automatically change over to match local ground systems e.g. at international boarders and allowed the driver to select from a range of language settings. STS Signals Ltd supplied electronic Train Protection and Warning System (TPWS) control units for class 92s as an add on to the Automatic Warning System (AWS) equipment. STS Signals Ltd also developed a twin-lightweight AWS receiver for use on class 92s so that only one receiver was needed to detect both standard strength magnets on lines powered by AC overhead wires (Rx1) as well as the extra strength magnets used on DC third rail lines (Rx2). All non-metallic components of the class 92 were either certified for Eurotunnels fire regulations by the manufacturers or where suppliers could not provide this information products such as the divers seat (made by Chapman Seating Limited) and plastic push buttons were fire tested by BRUSH.

Untitled (In Memoriam, Jon Claremont)

Untitled (In Memoriam, Jon Claremont)

Some cool high-quality auto mould images:

Untitled (In Memoriam, Jon Claremont)
high-quality auto mould
Image by jay-chilli
From the photoblog Chillimatic

Posting a photo of a shop called "Party World" here is an odd way to memorialize someone. Bear with me, I’ll explain further down the page. Firstly a little on how I came to know about Jon Claremont and his work.

The service provider for my photoblog, Chillimatic, is called Expressions. Expressions won’t be rivalling Flickr any time soon and perhaps due to the small number of subscribers, or perhaps due to the good work of the people who run it, Expressions is a genuine ‘online community’ (prior to joining I had thought this phrase an oxymoron) brought together by a shared love of photography.

Some particularly high quality photoblogs are nestled alonside my own (frankly amateurish) site. Chief among these is a blog I discovered during my earliest nose around Expressions called ClaremontPhoto – Jon’s photoblog.

The aesthetic of Jon’s pictures was so different to that which currently prevails in photography that it was a shock when I first landed there. My eyes had become too accustomed to the diamond-sharp, perfectly colour-balanced images that digital technology has made possible to immediately accept photos taken with film cameras and developed at the local One Hour Photo. Jon’s snaps were often blurry and overexposed with no apparent colour scheme. His subjects rarely sat nicely in measured compositions.

Even when he was photographing the patrons of the shabby café-bars of Montemor-o-Novo, the town in Portugal where he lived – subjects who were in fact seated and immobile – there was always a touch of anarchy, a touch of humanity, his photos were alive. He once remarked in an e-mail to me that he didn’t do “pretty pictures”. He was wrong. His photos were beautiful, and in a way that all those diamond-sharp digital images could never be.

I started leaving comments on Jon’s site, he on mine, and our intermittent e-mail exchanges began. Just as one had to get past the aesthetic shock and look carefully at Jon’s photos to fully appreciate them so he looked carefully at others’. More than once he remarked on something in one of my shots that I hadn’t noticed myself. For this reason his words of encouragement were valuable to me; his appreciation was genuine.

Jon’s warmth of character was a further quality as apparent in his photos as his mails. Most of his shots were of the inhabitants of Montemor, a village lost in the countryside 40 miles to the east of Lisbon, a town not pretty enough for tourism nor rich enough for chain store homogeneity.

Similarly, Montemor’s inhabitants are neither charmingly rustic nor the neat, presentable Gap-clad men and women that the global economy has moulded. They’re a scruffy lot, spending their evenings sitting awkwardly on bar furniture, drinking cheap beer straight from the bottle, looking up slack-jawed at the football on the telly. In viewing Jon’s photos I was often reminded of Oscar Wilde’s famous aphorism “Work is the curse of the drinking classes”.

Most photographers, I think, would maintain a certain distance between themselves and such subjects, one that would translate into a mocking tone in their photos or a falsely reverent one: ostensibly honouring such ‘salt of the earth’ characters, covertly pitying them. Jon did none of that; the section at ClaremontPhoto compiling his ‘people’ shots is titled “Friends and Neighbours”. Quite right, they were not his subjects, he was one of them. The warmth and camaraderie so apparent in his photography were equally evident in his words to me.

Soon after I was first in contact with Jon he was appointed as Community Ambassador at Expressions, bringing to the members’ attention the work of other Expressions contributors, and continuing to offer words of encouragement and genuine appreciation to so many of us. He was very much the glue in our online community and I know that I am not alone in saying how greatly missed he will be.

I learnt of Jon’s passing on Friday and that same day Shanolyno, a fellow Expressions user, posted a comment on my photoblog. I mailed him to say thanks and told him the sad news. His words in reply voiced my own thoughts perfectly: “Seems strange to mourn for someone that I feel I know so well, yet I never met.”

I never met Jon Claremont either, I never even spoke to him and yet he touched me in some way, he inspired me, and I will miss him. For those that did know this clearly exceptional man, his family and friends, the loss must be very great indeed and my thoughts are with them.

So, the photo of “Party World”. It was taken in July of last year with a DSLR which I’d just bought, on the day I arrived in Sardinia, my holiday destination. During the preceding months I had spent much time on photography: taking photographs, tending to my website, reading about photography, viewing the work of others and occasionally exchanging e-mails with Jon.

Shortly before I left we had a quick exchange about Martin Parr, whose work we both admired. I wrote: “Regarding Martin Parr, yes the man is a genius, but I also kind of hate him because it’s become impossible to take photos in certain areas (supermarkets and seaside towns in the UK particularly) without thinking of his brilliant photos. He kind of owns all that now. If I ever find myself in a run down bar in Portugal and I’m unable to take photos because you’ve taken all the ideas and own that environment I’ll let you know.”

When I arrived in Olbia this throwaway comment had transformed into prophecy. Maybe it was the intensity of the sunlight (in Jon’s outdoor shots the walls and streets of Montemor appeared sun-bleached) or maybe it was the slightly tattered look that much of Olbia still has despite a recent influx of tourists courtesy of EasyJet, but I was unable to take pictures of the place, I saw Jon’s photos everywhere.

Thwarted in my attempts to take my own photos I decided to produce some imitation Claremonts. I turned the exposure up a notch to get the bleached look, switched the focus setting to “auto” to lose some sharpness and took a couple of shots of shop fronts which I imagined wouldn’t be out of place in Montemor. This shot was the most successful. I had intended to send it to him but, very regrettably now, never got round to it.

But "Party World", though? Surely not the best way to memorialize someone? Like I say – bear with me. This shop, despite its apparent banality, despite the cheap plastic knick-knacks it displays in the window, proudly proclaims itself “Party World” and this is in keeping with the meaning I read behind many of Jon’s photos. Despite the tawdriness of their surroundings; despite their shabby clothes; despite the cheap beer they’re given to drink every night; despite the fact that they live in a forgotten hinterland, held there just above the breadline; despite the fact that they’re old and working class (both characteristics that were once a source of pride but not so much these days); despite all this and much more, the people in Jon’s photos are mostly smiling. They’re happy.

My favourite of Jon’s photos is of a frail old man who sells lottery tickets from in front of a bar. According to the text accompanying the photo he’s there every week with the same patter, every week he has “the big one”. There he is – leaning against a rubbish bin, an expression of rapt wonder on his face as he eyes the little scraps of paper in his hand which, despite the 10-million-to-one odds, are going to bring in the jackpot. The Don Quixote of Montemor, he is both a fool and a hero.

As summations of the human condition go, it’s hard to beat. We are born into a world without purpose or meaning where there is but one truth: that one day, soon, we will be gone from it, obliterated. We have no chance; we are playing a machine we will never beat, which metes out suffering so much more than joy… And yet we still believe, holy fools that we are, that we’re going to land "the big one", that “A vida é uma festa!” Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to Party World.

So rest in peace, Jon Claremont, and thank you for showing me all this.

If you’ve read this far I hope you’ll click on the link for ClaremontPhoto. Many of his older photos (including the lottery ticket seller) have disappeared but there remain many photos of exceptional quality.

Image from page 46 of “Canadian foundryman (1921)” (1921)
high-quality auto mould
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: canfoundryman1921toro
Title: Canadian foundryman (1921)
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects: Foundries Foundry workers
Publisher: Toronto : MacLean Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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Text Appearing Before Image:
while mold-ing sand experts seem to put most stresson the size of the grain, and as a secondin importance the amount of bond, butthe shape of the grain and the chemicalContinued on page 39 January, 1921 39 NEW AND IMPROVED EQUIPMENT A Record of Machinery Development Tending Towards Higher Quality,Output and Efficiency in Foundry, Pattern and Metal Work Generally THE AUTO SAND-CUTTINGMACHINE The American Foundry EquipmentCompany, 366 Madison avenue, NewYork City, are putting on the market anovel device in the way of a machine forcutting over sand heaps. As shown inthe illustration, it is a combination ofspiral blades revolving on an axle in a The distinguishing feature of this newladle design is the fact that the gearingis mounted on the trunnion instead ofon the bail. Consequently any distortionof the bail or bowl will not interfere withthe alignment of the gears. The man-ner in which the gear bracket engagesthe bail is clearly illustrated in photoherewith. A further advantage of this

Text Appearing After Image:
THE MODERN METHOD OF CUTTING UP THE SAND HEAP. similar manner to those of a lawn mow-er, but being right and left, and con-verging towards the center. The machineis motor-driven and straddles over thesand. When a sand heap is to be cutover the machine is put at one end ofthe floor and is automatically drivenover the sand. As the machine movesalong, the blades revolve and break upthe lumps, thoroughly mix the sand andpile it up in a long windrow the same asa molder would do with a shovel, but more uniform in temper. If desiredto have the sand in a pile against thewall the machine can be run over theheap as often as required until the sandis back far enough. The sand is notthrown at the heap, but is thrown aboutfour feet into the air and falls on thepile in the form of dust. The machineis known as the Auto Sand-Cutter andis made in two types; the traction typeas shown in the illustration and thecrane type, which is suspended from theshop crane and which is especially adapt-ed to situati

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1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan

1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan

A few nice auto fender mould design images I found:

1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan
auto fender mould design
Image by glennfrancosimmons_
This 1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan was displayed at the 2010 Palo Alto Concours d’Elegance in the San Francisco Bay Area.

“The Cadillac Sixty Special name has been used by Cadillac to denote a special model since the 1938 Harley Earl-Bill Mitchell-designed Series 60 derivative,” according to Wikipedia. “The Sixty Special name would soon be synonymous for some of Cadillac’s most luxurious vehicles. …

“Starting in 1940, and for the remainder of its existence, the Sixty Special would be Fleetwood marketed, enjoying higher-priced molding, trim and upholstery like the Series 75 and 90. Thus it took over the Series 70’s place, which was dropped for the 1938 model year, as Cadillac’s most luxurious owner-driven large model — a role it would fill through 1976.

“1941 was the last year of Harley Earl and Bill Mitchell’s original Sixty Special design, as an all-new 1942 model was in the works. Many consider the 1941 to the most beautiful of this series, though Mitchell himself favored the clean lines of the original 1938 model. For the first time, Cadillac had its own front end design—the ‘tombstone’ grille with a high center section flanked by lower side sections — that would identify Cadillacs for years to come.

“The new ‘face’ blended well with the original body, and the rear fenders now held full skirts. For 1941, the wheelbase was reduced by 1 inch (25 mm), down to 126 in (3,200 mm).

“Sixty Specials showed a 5 price increase (for the first time) to ,195. Power was still supplied by the same 346 cu in (5.67 L) Cadillac engine as before, but was now rated at 150 hp (110 kW). Production totals include 3,878 Touring sedans (including 185 with the sun roof option), and 220 Imperial sedans (now priced at ,345).

“Only one Sixty Special Town Car was made this year and used on the auto show circuit before being purchased by film director, C.B. DeMille. Featuring the leather-covered roof, it was the last one to come from Cadillac-Fleetwood.

“There were nearly 17,900 Sixty Specials made from 1938 to 1941, including about a dozen custom-bodied versions.”

1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan
auto fender mould design
Image by glennfrancosimmons_
This 1941 Cadillac Sixty Touring Sedan was displayed at the 2010 Palo Alto Concours d’Elegance in the San Francisco Bay Area.

“The Cadillac Sixty Special name has been used by Cadillac to denote a special model since the 1938 Harley Earl-Bill Mitchell-designed Series 60 derivative,” according to Wikipedia. “The Sixty Special name would soon be synonymous for some of Cadillac’s most luxurious vehicles. …

“Starting in 1940, and for the remainder of its existence, the Sixty Special would be Fleetwood marketed, enjoying higher-priced molding, trim and upholstery like the Series 75 and 90. Thus it took over the Series 70’s place, which was dropped for the 1938 model year, as Cadillac’s most luxurious owner-driven large model — a role it would fill through 1976.

“1941 was the last year of Harley Earl and Bill Mitchell’s original Sixty Special design, as an all-new 1942 model was in the works. Many consider the 1941 to the most beautiful of this series, though Mitchell himself favored the clean lines of the original 1938 model. For the first time, Cadillac had its own front end design—the ‘tombstone’ grille with a high center section flanked by lower side sections — that would identify Cadillacs for years to come.

“The new ‘face’ blended well with the original body, and the rear fenders now held full skirts. For 1941, the wheelbase was reduced by 1 inch (25 mm), down to 126 in (3,200 mm).

“Sixty Specials showed a 5 price increase (for the first time) to ,195. Power was still supplied by the same 346 cu in (5.67 L) Cadillac engine as before, but was now rated at 150 hp (110 kW). Production totals include 3,878 Touring sedans (including 185 with the sun roof option), and 220 Imperial sedans (now priced at ,345).

“Only one Sixty Special Town Car was made this year and used on the auto show circuit before being purchased by film director, C.B. DeMille. Featuring the leather-covered roof, it was the last one to come from Cadillac-Fleetwood.

“There were nearly 17,900 Sixty Specials made from 1938 to 1941, including about a dozen custom-bodied versions.”